Creating Characters with Personality – For Film, TV, Animation, Video Games, and Graphic Novels

About the Author
Tom Bancroft has been an animator
for more than fifteen years, working
for Disney and Big Idea Productions
(producers of Veggie Tales). Most recently, he contributed to Disney’s Brother Bear. He lives in Franklin, TN.

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Creating Characters with Personality – For Film, TV, Animation, Video Games, and Graphic Novels

From Snow White to Shrek, from Fred Flintstone to SpongeBob SquarePants, the design of a character conveys personality before a single word of dialogue is spoken. Designing Characters with Personality shows artists how to create a distinctive character, then place that character in context within a script, establish hierarchy, and maximize the impact of pose and expression. Practical exercises help readers put everything together to make their new characters sparkle. Lessons from the author, who designed the dragon Mushu (voiced by Eddie Murphy) in Disney’s Mulan—plus big-name experts in film, TV, video games, and graphic novels—make a complex subject accessible to every artist.

Go, Dog. Go! – P. D. Eastman

Go, Dog. Go! is a 1961 children’s book written and illustrated by P. D. Eastman. It describes the actions and interactions of a group of highly mobile dogs, who operate cars and other conveyances in pursuit of work, play, and a final mysterious goal: a dog party.

The book introduces concepts such as color and relative position with simple language and humor. (“The blue dog is in. The red dog is out.”)

The book helps children learn basic concepts and actions like playing, working, going up, going down. The book also teaches children colors and conveys emotion.[1] The dogs featured in the book use their cars to help them get their work done and get to places. Throughout the book, details in Eastman’s illustrations seem to invite the reader to notice the deeper significance of small things. In their first appearance, a pink dog asks a yellow dog if he likes her hat with its little flower. He does not, so they leave. Several pages later, we meet them again. Now they are riding scooters; she has a hat with a feather. Again, he does not like her hat, but as they part, he has made off with the feather. When we next see them together, they are skiing. The yellow dog does not like the long ski cap the pink dog is wearing. They leave as she bids him an angry farewell. In their final meeting, her hat is even more elaborate and finally meets the approval of the yellow dog; in this way, a relationship is developed between the characters despite the simplicity of the text. It shows interaction when the dogs meet. Throughout the book, there is an unclear outcome of what the book is trying to show but towards the end all of the dogs have a party.

The animator’s sketchbook – how to see, interpret & draw like a master animator

Key Features

Provides readers with their own personal sketchbook, demonstrating classical art skills that are highly prized by studio employers
Readers will come away better visualizing form, gesture, pose and expression Includes 60 speed and gesture drawing exercises
Provides the perfect way for students of animation to improve their core skills
Perfect for animation instructors who can rely on this unique course workbook to take their students to new levels of classic visualizing expertise

Walt Disney World and Orlando for Dummies 2006

If you want to escape to a world full of fun and fantasy, head for Walt Disney World & Orlando. The area is the No. 1 family vacation destination in the U.S., and this guide will show you hundreds of reasons why. Whether you’re taking your kids or grandkids or treating your “inner child”, you’ll find tons to see and do. You can count a shark’s teeth up close or swim with a dolphin. Tour some of the world’s most unique countries at Epcot or the Haunted Mansion at the Magic Kingdom. Strap in for stomach-churning rides or take in great shows. You can check out incredible marine life, exotic wild life, or Orlando’s exciting night life. This friendly guide clues you in to must-see attractions, the best deals, great shopping options, and more. It gives you the scoop on:

Walt Disney World, including The Magic Kingdom, Epcot, Disney-MGM Studios, Animal Kingdom, and more
Other terrific theme parks, including Universal Studios Florida, Islands of Adventure, SeaWorld and Discovery Cove, and more
The best daring thrill rides, including The Amazing Adventures of Spider-Man, Dueling Dragons twin roller coasters, Jurassic Park River Adventure, and the Tower of Terror
Tamer rides and attractions, such as Pirates of the Caribbean, Indiana Jones Epic Stunt Spectacular, Shrek 4-D, and Kilimanjaro Safari
Great shows, parades, fireworks displays, and more

Like every For Dummies travel guide, Walt Disney World & Orlando For Dummies 2006 includes:

Down-to-earth trip-planning advice
What you shouldn’t miss — and what you can skip
The best hotels and restaurants for every budget
Handy Post-it® Flags to mark your favorite pages

MacromediaFlash 8 for Dummies

Make the Web interactive with your own animations

Liven up your Web site with graphics that move, buttons that light up, and more

Flash is fun – and this book makes it easy whether you’re using a Mac(r) or Windows(r). Fill letters with images, create buttons that glow or change color when you pass your mouse over them, play video and sound files, morph objects into different ones, and do dozens of other things to make your site flashier.

Discover how to

* Create animated text
* Find sample Flash files
* Explore links to additional information
* Add sound and video
* Build great user interfaces
* Publish your Flash files