Sony CLIE For Dummies

From the Back Cover
Put your office and more in the palm of your hand!
Manage contacts, tasks, and appointments, send e-mail, and play games

Your Sony CLIÉ is an amazing gadget, and with this book to guide you, it’ll soon become your best friend. Sure, it keeps your schedule, to-do list, and address book, but did you know it’ll also play music and movies, show off pictures of the kids, and maybe even take them, too? Find out how!

The Dummies Way

Explanations in plain English
“Get in, get out” information
Icons and other navigational aids
Tear-out cheat sheet
Top ten lists
A dash of humor and fun
Discover how to:

Manage Word and Excel files
HotSync your CLIÉ to your PC
Play games, read e-books, and watch movies
Create business cards
Enter appointments and set alarms
Extend your CLIÉ’s memory

About the Author
Denny Atkin has been writing about technology since 1987, a primitive age where pioneer computer users toyed with Atari 800s and Commodore Amigas and actually typed in programs printed in magazines instead of downloading them. His articles have appeared in a variety of magazines ranging from pioneering technology/science publications Compute! and OMNI to Wired, Entertainment Weekly, Computer Gaming World, Computer Shopper, and Handheld Computing magazine. He has written a number of books, such as the one you’re holding, and has appeared on Tech TV and CNN.

He’s been using handhelds since the days of the original Apple “I don’t understand what you’re trying to write” Newton. He practices what he preaches, typically traveling with a CLIÉ, a folding keyboard, and a Bluetooth cell phone instead of a bulky laptop.
Atkin lives with his wife and son in Vermont, where he’s doing long-term tests of the CLIÉ’s ability to operate during ridiculously lengthy periods of sub-zero temperatures.

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iPAQ For Dummies boils down all this complicated, amazing technology into understandable pieces. Whether you’ve never used a Pocket PC before or you’re just new to the iPAQ, this handy guide will help you

– Navigate the iPAQ interface
– Use the address book and calendar
– Schedule appointments
– Sync your iPAQ with your desktop
– Back up your files
– Create pocket spreadsheets, and more

At the heart of iPAQ’s power is the new Windows Mobile 2003 operating system, with its improved security and network support, better Web browsing, and smoother synchronization for e-mail, calendars, and contacts. iPAQ For Dummies shows you how to use that power to

– Use the menus, change your screen settings, and establish a password
– Enter information into your iPAQ in various ways
– Surf the Web, read e-mail and e-books, and download music
– Create documents and spreadsheets with the pocket versions of Word, Excel, and Money
– Manage your calendar, contacts, and “to do” list
– Entertain yourself with games while you wait for that appointment
– Edit and display photos on your iPAQ, and much more

You can even connect a GPS and all sorts of other cool add-ons to your iPAQ. iPAQ For Dummies tells you the best choices, what they do, and how to use them. With an iPAQ in one hand and this book in the other, you’ll be able to do things you never thought possible.

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If you’re like most people, the above seems like nonsense. Actually, it’s computer sense―C programming. After digesting C For Dummies, 2nd Edition, you’ll understand it. C programs are fast, concise and versatile. They let you boss your computer around for a change. So turn on your computer, get a free compiler and editor (the book tells you where), pull up a chair, and get going. You won’t have to go far (page 13) to find your first program example. You’ll do short, totally manageable, hands-on exercises to help you make sense of:

All 32 keywords in the C language (that’s right―just 32 words)
The functions―several dozen of them
Terms like printf(), scanf(), gets (), and puts ()
String variables, numeric variables, and constants
Looping and implementation
Floating-point values
In case those terms are almost as intimidating as the idea of programming, be reassured that C For Dummies was written by Dan Gookin, bestselling author of DOS For Dummies, the book that started the whole library. So instead of using expletives and getting headaches, you’ll be using newly acquired skills and getting occasional chuckles as you discover how to:

Design and develop programs
Add comments (like post-it-notes to yourself) as you go
Link code to create executable programs
Debug and deploy your programs
Use lint, a common tool to examine and optimize your code
A helpful, tear-out cheat sheet is a quick reference for comparison symbols, conversion characters, mathematical doodads, C numeric data types, and more. C For Dummies takes the mystery out of programming and gets you into it quickly and painlessly.

Buying a Computer For Dummies 2005 Edition

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Choose the right software for your needs
Pick the right peripherals, including monitor, printer, scanner, modem, keyboard, and more
Spend “extra” money strategically to get more computer power for your buck
Choose disk drives, including info on CD-ROM, DVD, Floppy, Zip, and flash memory cards
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Getting a network card (NIC) for a broadband modem if you want the fastest Internet connection
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Software for word processing, databases, desktop publishing, home budgeting, spreadsheets, graphics. and more
Essential utilities, including antivirus, anti-spyware, and firewall software
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Oh, and it also tells you what all of the acronyms at the top stand for!

C for Dummies 2nd Edition

If you’re like most people, the above seems like nonsense. Actually, it’s computer sense―C programming. After digesting C For Dummies, 2nd Edition, you’ll understand it. C programs are fast, concise and versatile. They let you boss your computer around for a change. So turn on your computer, get a free compiler and editor (the book tells you where), pull up a chair, and get going. You won’t have to go far (page 13) to find your first program example. You’ll do short, totally manageable, hands-on exercises to help you make sense of:

All 32 keywords in the C language (that’s right―just 32 words)
The functions―several dozen of them
Terms like printf(), scanf(), gets (), and puts ()
String variables, numeric variables, and constants
Looping and implementation
Floating-point values

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Design and develop programs
Add comments (like post-it-notes to yourself) as you go
Link code to create executable programs
Debug and deploy your programs

Use lint, a common tool to examine and optimize your code
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TiVo to the rescue. TiVo lets you watch what you want when you want to. You can pause live TV, replay missed high points, skip commercials, and even get TiVo to find and record stuff you’ll be interested in! TiVo For Dummies shows you how, even if you’re one of the millions whose VCR clock is only right twice a day! You’ll discover how to:

Choose the right TiVo for your needs and your TV service
Get an “instant replay” with the click of a button
Use a Season Pass to get TiVo to seek out and record all episodes of a favorite TV show, no matter when they air
Create a WishList so you can turn on whatever turns you on; TiVo will find and record specified TV shows, movie titles, and programs with your favorite actors or directors
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Use TiVo’s Home Media Option (HMO) to play yourMP3 music files and view digital photos
Fast-forward through commercials, sometimes cutting an hour show to 40 minutes
Use Parental Controls to lock out specific channels or filter individual shows based on content
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A diagram of the TiVo remote with call-outs and descriptions of what all 26 buttons do
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Suggestions about additional software you may want for TiVo HMO, including MoodLogic that becomes your personal disc jockey
Web sites that give all kinds of TiVo information
A glossary

TiVo puts you in control of your TV viewing, and TiVo For Dummies puts you in control of TiVo!