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Fundamentals Of Photonic Crystal Guiding.pdf

For anyone looking to understand photonic crystals, this systematic, rigorous, and pedagogical introduction is a must. Here you’ll find intuitive analytical and semi-analytical models applied to complex and practically relevant photonic crystal structures. You will also be shown how to use various analytical methods borrowed from quantum mechanics, such as perturbation theory, asymptotic analysis, and group theory, to investigate many of the limiting properties of photonic crystals which are otherwise difficult to rationalize using only numerical simulations. An introductory review of nonlinear guiding in photonic lattices is also presented, as are the fabrication and application of photonic crystals. In addition, end-of-chapter exercise problems with detailed analytical and numerical solutions allow you to monitor your understanding of the material presented. This accessible text is ideal for researchers and graduate students studying photonic crystals in departments of electrical engineering, physics, applied physics and mathematics.

Colloidal Polymers: Synthesis and Characterization

Amidst developments in nanotechnology and successes in catalytic emulsion polymerization of olefins, polymerization in dispersed media is arousing an increasing interest from both practical and fundamental points of view. This text describes ultramodern approaches to synthesis, preparation, characterization, and functionalization of latexes, nanoparticles, and numerous additional colloidal polymer systems. In chapters contributed by leading international researchers, it communicates critical parameters for method selection, presents guidelines for controlling structural and colloid properties, presents recent results and information on polymer colloids, and describes other tools to assist in the production of desirable outcomes.

Preparative Liquid Chromatography

This volume provides a straightforward approach to isolation and purification problems with a thorough presentation of preparative LC strategy including the interrelationship between the input and output of the instrumentation, while keeping to an application focus.

The book stresses the practical aspects of preparative scale separations from TLC isolations through various laboratory scale column separations to very large scale production. It also gives a thorough description of the performance parameters (e.g. throughput, separation quality, etc.) as a function of operational parameters (e.g. particle size, column size, solvent usage, etc.). Experts in the field have contributed a well balanced presentation of separation development strategies from preparative TLC to commercial preparative process with practical examples in a wide variety of application areas such as drugs, proteins, nucleotides, industrial extracts, organic chemicals, enantiomers, polymers, etc.

Molecular Imprinting Of Polymers Pilesky Turner Landes Bioscience 2006

One of Nature’s most important talents is evolutionary development of systems capable of molecular recognition: distinguishing one molecule from another. Molecular recognition is the basis for most biological processes, such as ligandreceptor binding, substrate-enzyme reactions and translation and transcription of the genetic code and is therefore of universal interest. Over the past four decades, researchers have been inspired by Nature to produce biomimetic materials with molecular recognition properties, by design rather than by evolution. A particularly exciting area of biomimetics is Molecular Imprinting, which can be defined as process of template-induced formation of specific recognition sites (binding or catalytic) in a material where the template directs the positioning and orientation of the material’s structural components by a self-assembling mechanism. The material itself could be oligomeric (the typical example is DNA replication process), polymeric (organic MIPs and inorganic imprinted silica gels) or 2-dimensional surface assembly (grafted monolayers). Essentially the current progress in the field of molecular imprinting is a result of fundamental achievements made by more than a hundred groups working in the areas of non-covalent and reversible covalent imprinting. The goal of this title is to capture this momentum and publish a new book that will reflect the current situation in this rapidly evolving technology. Very few of the tens of reviews already published on this subject present a critical analysis of the technological aspects of molecular imprinting. Leaders in this field have been approached with requests to provide their views and analyses of specific areas of design, characterization and application of these polymers. The main body of Molecular Imprinting of Polymers starts with chapters covering polymer design, synthesis, and characterization that are prepared by well-recognized experts such as Andrew Mayes and Natalia Perez-Moral, Claud